Tuesday, November 21st, 2017 09:22 PM

Posts Tagged ‘Wellington’

Wellington: August 6, 2010

Monday, August 9th, 2010

I made another trip to Wellington, WA on August 6, 2010. I was there for the entire day and well into the night. In the evening, I met up with Bert and Jayme of NWPIA, Tom and Jami of BGH, Scott of ParaWa and others. Although I did not have any personal experiences with the paranomal that night, it was great to meet with all of them and to learn more new things about investigating.

Earlier in the day, I was conducting several EVP sessions in the snow shed. Durinng one particular session, I picked up the voice of “a child singing or humming.“. I did not hear this at the time it happened.

A reveiw of the recording of a ghost box session I made ealier in the day revealed three interesting voices.

1. Just 46 seconds into the ghost box session, a voice says “Grandpa. It's Albert.“. Among the dead of the Wellington disaster were two people with the name Albert: Albert Boles and Albert G. Mahler.


2. Another one says “Paul. Listen. It's me, (Ben?).“. Among the dead of the Wellington disaster were two people with the name Ben or Benjamin: Benjamin G. Thompson, and Benjamin F. Jarnagan, 31, engineer.


3. The third ghost box voice was a direct response to my request. I said “If you can hear my voice, tell me what color the chair is that I am sitting in.” The immediate response: “It's blue.“. I was in fact sitting in a blue folding chair.

Another Wellington ghost box EVP…

Sunday, July 18th, 2010

While re-listening to the ‘ghost box’ audio files from my first Wellington visit (June 18, 2010), I discovered another interesting EVP. It sounds like a female voice singing
'You promised me, did you not?' then a male voice says 'Yes!'“.

Wellington Avalanche Disaster, March 1, 1910.

Monday, June 21st, 2010

June 18, 2010
It was my first visit to the site of the March 1, 1910 Wellington (now Tye) train disaster in which 96 or more people died. There I met up with Bert and Jayme Coates of NWPIA. They have made many investigations of this location and are very well versed in the history and events which transpired there. They were kind in sharing their paranormal experiences. One of their experiences involved the sighting of an apparition which had no face, hence the nick-name “no-face”. On the evening of June 18, 2010 they allowed me to record their “ghost box” session, in which two very interesting voices were captured on my digital recorder. When I finally realized what was being said in this first one, it shocked me to my bones.
Henry, I feel like I've lost my face.

Wellington Avalanche

By Allan Hirsch